Archive for the The Commentator Category

In praise of those who “go”

Many years ago, I was watching a televised roundtable on the media when Dan Rather, then a rock star among CBS correspondents, was asked why he had the good fortune to work in Washington while other journalists labored in, say, Tulsa. “Because,” he replied, “when things happen, […]

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Obama’s visit won’t change Israeli-Palestinian stand-off

President Obama’s decision to visit Israel, the West Bank, and Jordan in the coming weeks proves the continuing endurance of certain truths about our recent presidents as well as conventional wisdom about the region. What it does not prove, however, is that he will do any better […]

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On Iran, the right lesson is Hitler, not Mao

History is an imperfect teacher. The lessons from events of the past often contradict one another, leaving policymakers the challenge of deciding which ones are most relevant to the issues of today. That challenge lies at the heart of the debate over what to do about Iran’s […]

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America’s lessons in governing

The Commentator’s European readers could learn lots from how we, in the United States of America, run our government. We are, after all, the world’s richest, most powerful, and most stable democracy. Nothing better illustrates our genius for governance than how we do our most fundamental business, […]

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U.S. leadership vital for freedom’s future

When, in 1944, Winston Churchill suggested that the Allies consider the Vatican’s views when planning the future of a heavily Catholic Poland, Stalin famously replied, “The Pope? How many divisions has he got?” The Pope had no divisions, of course. But, as Stalin’s successors would learn, he […]

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